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Greetings

Greetings... this blog is a higgledy-piggledy pile of social-political stuff, pictures I like, and general ramblings.
I'm also involved in wangclub.tumblr.com
Oct 20 '14
Oct 17 '14

explore-blog:

“Ernest Hemingway would have died rather than have syntax. Or semicolons. I use a whole lot of half-assed semicolons; there was one of them just now; that was a semicolon after “semicolons,” and another one after “now.” And another thing. Ernest Hemingway would have died rather than get old. And he did. He shot himself. A short sentence. Anything rather than a long sentence, a life sentence. Death sentences are short and very, very manly. Life sentences aren’t. They go on and on, all full of syntax and qualifying clauses and confusing references and getting old. And that brings up the real proof of what a mess I have made of being a man.”

Ursula K. Le Guin on being a man – the finest, sharpest thing I’ve read in ages 

Oct 11 '14
"Dualisms are not just free-floating systems of ideas; they are closely associated with domination and accumulation, and are the major cultural expressions and justifications. But I do not mean to imply by this that accumulation, the material sphere, is the real motor and the cultural sphere merely its reflection as assumed in some forms of Marxist theory. The material and the cultural spheres both do the work of domination and may be thought of as mutually selecting one another, just as particular technologies are both selected by certain social and political arrangements and elect them, helping to maintain, strengthen and prepare the ground for certain types of social structures."
Val Plumwood, ‘Feminism & the Mastery of Nature’ (via aidsnegligee)
Oct 11 '14
Oct 10 '14
Oct 10 '14
Oct 10 '14
fancybidet:

tattrx:

Micah Riot Tattoo - Fern Sleeve for Tara tattrx.com/artists/micah-riot
tumblr: micahriot

shitttt

Ferns! Tattoo! Fern tattoo! obviously. 

fancybidet:

tattrx:

Micah Riot Tattoo - Fern Sleeve for Tara
tattrx.com/artists/micah-riot

tumblr: micahriot

shitttt

Ferns! Tattoo! Fern tattoo! obviously. 

Oct 2 '14
Sep 25 '14

blackboybe:

(video)

Genocide is defined by the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide as “any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: killing members of the group; causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; [and] forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.” 

Sep 24 '14
Aug 27 '14

super-who-locked-in:

angle-of-depression:

nothingcorporate:

opinions on abortions are kinda like nipples

everyone has them but women’s are a little bit more relevant 

But all you ever see are men’s

Oh shit

:)

(Source: uncooler)

Aug 24 '14

wangclub:

strolling | black british women, gentrification in london & more

Aug 21 '14

nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker 

"The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: 
Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”

Barbara Walker - 
Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm

Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm

Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm

Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm

Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm

Aug 21 '14
thepeoplesrecord:

Indian burial ground paved over for million dollar housesApril 29, 2014
A treasure trove of Coast Miwok life dating back 4,500 years - older than King Tut’s tomb - was discovered in Marin County and then destroyed to make way for multimillion-dollar homes, archaeologists told The Chronicle this week.
The American Indian burial ground and village site, so rich in history that it was dubbed the “grandfather midden,” was examined and categorized under a shroud of secrecy before construction began this month on the $55 million Rose Lane development in Larkspur.
The 300-foot-long site contained 600 human burials, tools, musical instruments, harpoon tips, spears and throwing sticks from a time long before the introduction of the bow and arrow. The bones of grizzly and black bears were also found, along with a ceremonial California condor burial.
"This was a site of considerable archaeological value," said Dwight Simons, a consulting archaeologist who analyzed 7,200 bones, including the largest collection of bear bones ever found in a prehistoric site in the Bay Area. “My estimate of bones and fragments in the entire site was easily over a million, and probably more than that. It was staggering.”
No artifacts were saved
All of it, including stone tools and idols apparently created for trade with other tribes, was removed, reburied in an undisclosed location on site and apparently graded over, destroying the geologic record and ending any chance of future study, archaeologists said. Not a single artifact was saved.
Lost forever was a carbon-dated record in the soil layers of indigenous life going back approximately to the time the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. It was, said several prominent archaeologists, the largest, best-preserved, most ethnologically rich American Indian site found in the Bay Area in at least a century.
"It should have been protected," said Jelmer Eerkens, a professor of archaeology at UC Davis who visited the site as a guest scholar.”The developers have the right to develop their land, but at least the information contained in the site should have been protected and samples should have been saved so that they could be studied in the future.”
The shell mound was first documented in Larkspur in 1907, but no one knew its significance until a developer decided to build homes, prompting an examination of the grounds.
Archaeologists brought in
The development was approved by the city in 2010, but the developer, Larkspur Land 8 Owner LLC, was required under the California Environmental Quality Act to bring in archaeologists to study the shell mound under the direction of American Indian monitors before it could build.
The developers hired San Francisco’s Holman & Associates Archaeological Consultants to conduct an excavation, and that firm spent the past year and a half on the site, calling in 25 archaeologists and 10 other specialists to study aspects of the mound. As required by the environmental act, their work was monitored by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, who were designated the most likely descendants of Larkspur’s indigenous people.
The American Indian leaders ultimately decided how the findings would be handled, and they defended their decision to remove and rebury the human remains and burial artifacts.
"The philosophy of the tribe in general is that we would like to protect our cultural resources and leave them as is," said Nick Tipon, a longtime member of the Sacred Sites Protection Committee of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. “The notion that these cultural artifacts belong to the public is a colonial view.”
But Eerkens and several other top archaeologists said a lot more could have been done to protect the shell mound. The problem was that the work was done under a confidentiality agreement, so little was known about it until March when some of the archaeologists discussed their work during a Society for California Archaeology symposium in Visalia.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Indian burial ground paved over for million dollar houses
April 29, 2014

A treasure trove of Coast Miwok life dating back 4,500 years - older than King Tut’s tomb - was discovered in Marin County and then destroyed to make way for multimillion-dollar homes, archaeologists told The Chronicle this week.

The American Indian burial ground and village site, so rich in history that it was dubbed the “grandfather midden,” was examined and categorized under a shroud of secrecy before construction began this month on the $55 million Rose Lane development in Larkspur.

The 300-foot-long site contained 600 human burials, tools, musical instruments, harpoon tips, spears and throwing sticks from a time long before the introduction of the bow and arrow. The bones of grizzly and black bears were also found, along with a ceremonial California condor burial.

"This was a site of considerable archaeological value," said Dwight Simons, a consulting archaeologist who analyzed 7,200 bones, including the largest collection of bear bones ever found in a prehistoric site in the Bay Area. “My estimate of bones and fragments in the entire site was easily over a million, and probably more than that. It was staggering.”

No artifacts were saved

All of it, including stone tools and idols apparently created for trade with other tribes, was removed, reburied in an undisclosed location on site and apparently graded over, destroying the geologic record and ending any chance of future study, archaeologists said. Not a single artifact was saved.

Lost forever was a carbon-dated record in the soil layers of indigenous life going back approximately to the time the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. It was, said several prominent archaeologists, the largest, best-preserved, most ethnologically rich American Indian site found in the Bay Area in at least a century.

"It should have been protected," said Jelmer Eerkens, a professor of archaeology at UC Davis who visited the site as a guest scholar.”The developers have the right to develop their land, but at least the information contained in the site should have been protected and samples should have been saved so that they could be studied in the future.”

The shell mound was first documented in Larkspur in 1907, but no one knew its significance until a developer decided to build homes, prompting an examination of the grounds.

Archaeologists brought in

The development was approved by the city in 2010, but the developer, Larkspur Land 8 Owner LLC, was required under the California Environmental Quality Act to bring in archaeologists to study the shell mound under the direction of American Indian monitors before it could build.

The developers hired San Francisco’s Holman & Associates Archaeological Consultants to conduct an excavation, and that firm spent the past year and a half on the site, calling in 25 archaeologists and 10 other specialists to study aspects of the mound. As required by the environmental act, their work was monitored by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, who were designated the most likely descendants of Larkspur’s indigenous people.

The American Indian leaders ultimately decided how the findings would be handled, and they defended their decision to remove and rebury the human remains and burial artifacts.

"The philosophy of the tribe in general is that we would like to protect our cultural resources and leave them as is," said Nick Tipon, a longtime member of the Sacred Sites Protection Committee of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. “The notion that these cultural artifacts belong to the public is a colonial view.”

But Eerkens and several other top archaeologists said a lot more could have been done to protect the shell mound. The problem was that the work was done under a confidentiality agreement, so little was known about it until March when some of the archaeologists discussed their work during a Society for California Archaeology symposium in Visalia.

Full article

Aug 19 '14
wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).