Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Greetings

Greetings... this blog is a higgledy-piggledy pile of social-political stuff, pictures I like, and general ramblings.
I'm also involved in wangclub.tumblr.com
Aug 27 '14

super-who-locked-in:

angle-of-depression:

nothingcorporate:

opinions on abortions are kinda like nipples

everyone has them but women’s are a little bit more relevant 

But all you ever see are men’s

Oh shit

:)

(Source: uncooler)

Aug 24 '14

wangclub:

strolling | black british women, gentrification in london & more

Aug 21 '14

nsorommaglobal:

selected pieces from Louder Than Words Series by Barbara Walker 

"The artist began this series as a result of her son Solomon’s experiences with police: 
Between 2002 and 2006, aged between 17 and 21, the black artist Barbara Walker’s son Solomon was so often “stopped and searched” by the Birmingham police that it came to seem disproportionately significant and she began to record the situations in her artwork. At the end of each search, Solomon was presented with a yellow A5 copy of the official police form recording the questioning. The forms, combined with newspaper cuttings of seemingly racially motivated events, sketches of city sites and meticulously drawn portraits, now become the main background focus of Walker’s graphic “Louder Than Words” collages. It is this contrast, between officialdom’s authoritative and…dehumanising paperwork on the one hand, and a mother’s quite exquisitely sensitive recording of her son’s particular features on the other, that affords the series a rare poignancy.”

Barbara Walker - 
Brighter Future - Diptych, 2006, charcoal and conte on paper, 81 x 101cm

Barbara Walker - Series - … I can paint a picture with a pin - 2006, digital print media, 81 x 106 cm

Barbara Walker - Sol - 2007, charcoal on paper, 81 x 106cm

Barbara Walker - Time - 2009, mixed media on paper, 40 x 55cm

Barbara Walker - Untitled - 2006, digital mixed media print, 81 x 106cm

Aug 21 '14
thepeoplesrecord:

Indian burial ground paved over for million dollar housesApril 29, 2014
A treasure trove of Coast Miwok life dating back 4,500 years - older than King Tut’s tomb - was discovered in Marin County and then destroyed to make way for multimillion-dollar homes, archaeologists told The Chronicle this week.
The American Indian burial ground and village site, so rich in history that it was dubbed the “grandfather midden,” was examined and categorized under a shroud of secrecy before construction began this month on the $55 million Rose Lane development in Larkspur.
The 300-foot-long site contained 600 human burials, tools, musical instruments, harpoon tips, spears and throwing sticks from a time long before the introduction of the bow and arrow. The bones of grizzly and black bears were also found, along with a ceremonial California condor burial.
"This was a site of considerable archaeological value," said Dwight Simons, a consulting archaeologist who analyzed 7,200 bones, including the largest collection of bear bones ever found in a prehistoric site in the Bay Area. “My estimate of bones and fragments in the entire site was easily over a million, and probably more than that. It was staggering.”
No artifacts were saved
All of it, including stone tools and idols apparently created for trade with other tribes, was removed, reburied in an undisclosed location on site and apparently graded over, destroying the geologic record and ending any chance of future study, archaeologists said. Not a single artifact was saved.
Lost forever was a carbon-dated record in the soil layers of indigenous life going back approximately to the time the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. It was, said several prominent archaeologists, the largest, best-preserved, most ethnologically rich American Indian site found in the Bay Area in at least a century.
"It should have been protected," said Jelmer Eerkens, a professor of archaeology at UC Davis who visited the site as a guest scholar.”The developers have the right to develop their land, but at least the information contained in the site should have been protected and samples should have been saved so that they could be studied in the future.”
The shell mound was first documented in Larkspur in 1907, but no one knew its significance until a developer decided to build homes, prompting an examination of the grounds.
Archaeologists brought in
The development was approved by the city in 2010, but the developer, Larkspur Land 8 Owner LLC, was required under the California Environmental Quality Act to bring in archaeologists to study the shell mound under the direction of American Indian monitors before it could build.
The developers hired San Francisco’s Holman & Associates Archaeological Consultants to conduct an excavation, and that firm spent the past year and a half on the site, calling in 25 archaeologists and 10 other specialists to study aspects of the mound. As required by the environmental act, their work was monitored by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, who were designated the most likely descendants of Larkspur’s indigenous people.
The American Indian leaders ultimately decided how the findings would be handled, and they defended their decision to remove and rebury the human remains and burial artifacts.
"The philosophy of the tribe in general is that we would like to protect our cultural resources and leave them as is," said Nick Tipon, a longtime member of the Sacred Sites Protection Committee of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. “The notion that these cultural artifacts belong to the public is a colonial view.”
But Eerkens and several other top archaeologists said a lot more could have been done to protect the shell mound. The problem was that the work was done under a confidentiality agreement, so little was known about it until March when some of the archaeologists discussed their work during a Society for California Archaeology symposium in Visalia.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Indian burial ground paved over for million dollar houses
April 29, 2014

A treasure trove of Coast Miwok life dating back 4,500 years - older than King Tut’s tomb - was discovered in Marin County and then destroyed to make way for multimillion-dollar homes, archaeologists told The Chronicle this week.

The American Indian burial ground and village site, so rich in history that it was dubbed the “grandfather midden,” was examined and categorized under a shroud of secrecy before construction began this month on the $55 million Rose Lane development in Larkspur.

The 300-foot-long site contained 600 human burials, tools, musical instruments, harpoon tips, spears and throwing sticks from a time long before the introduction of the bow and arrow. The bones of grizzly and black bears were also found, along with a ceremonial California condor burial.

"This was a site of considerable archaeological value," said Dwight Simons, a consulting archaeologist who analyzed 7,200 bones, including the largest collection of bear bones ever found in a prehistoric site in the Bay Area. “My estimate of bones and fragments in the entire site was easily over a million, and probably more than that. It was staggering.”

No artifacts were saved

All of it, including stone tools and idols apparently created for trade with other tribes, was removed, reburied in an undisclosed location on site and apparently graded over, destroying the geologic record and ending any chance of future study, archaeologists said. Not a single artifact was saved.

Lost forever was a carbon-dated record in the soil layers of indigenous life going back approximately to the time the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. It was, said several prominent archaeologists, the largest, best-preserved, most ethnologically rich American Indian site found in the Bay Area in at least a century.

"It should have been protected," said Jelmer Eerkens, a professor of archaeology at UC Davis who visited the site as a guest scholar.”The developers have the right to develop their land, but at least the information contained in the site should have been protected and samples should have been saved so that they could be studied in the future.”

The shell mound was first documented in Larkspur in 1907, but no one knew its significance until a developer decided to build homes, prompting an examination of the grounds.

Archaeologists brought in

The development was approved by the city in 2010, but the developer, Larkspur Land 8 Owner LLC, was required under the California Environmental Quality Act to bring in archaeologists to study the shell mound under the direction of American Indian monitors before it could build.

The developers hired San Francisco’s Holman & Associates Archaeological Consultants to conduct an excavation, and that firm spent the past year and a half on the site, calling in 25 archaeologists and 10 other specialists to study aspects of the mound. As required by the environmental act, their work was monitored by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, who were designated the most likely descendants of Larkspur’s indigenous people.

The American Indian leaders ultimately decided how the findings would be handled, and they defended their decision to remove and rebury the human remains and burial artifacts.

"The philosophy of the tribe in general is that we would like to protect our cultural resources and leave them as is," said Nick Tipon, a longtime member of the Sacred Sites Protection Committee of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. “The notion that these cultural artifacts belong to the public is a colonial view.”

But Eerkens and several other top archaeologists said a lot more could have been done to protect the shell mound. The problem was that the work was done under a confidentiality agreement, so little was known about it until March when some of the archaeologists discussed their work during a Society for California Archaeology symposium in Visalia.

Full article

Aug 19 '14
wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

Aug 18 '14
Jul 28 '14

"for some scientists, the revelation that meditating can actually trigger molecular changes is groundbreaking"

Well they are shitty scientists then aren’t they. What neuroscientists doesn’t understand that learning a new mental trick will involve changes to the brain.

Can the pop science writers please stop with the body-soul (brain-mind) substance dualism.

This isn’t groundbreaking - it would be more confusing if meditation occured without any molecular changes.

HUmph.

Jul 21 '14
"The line between pragmatism (focusing on finding quick and practical solutions to specific issues) and respectability politics (making ourselves look ‘respectable’ in the eyes of those with power, often by disavowing the more marginalised members of our own community) is in places very thin indeed. I have learned over the years that pragmatism which isn’t built on a solid foundation of principles and ideals generally yields the wrong solutions and that there is a fine art to practising pragmatism without engaging in respectability politics."
Jul 13 '14

On Learning Self-Care

omnivory:

It’s taken so long to figure out what “self-care” is. And I’m still working on it. 

In some serious ways, I was neglected as a child. Not in the casual sense, but the clinical sense. Kids learn to care for themselves by being cared for, and seeing other people take care of themselves. In many basic and important ways, I wasn’t cared for. And my parents weren’t great at caring for themselves,…

View On WordPress

Jul 9 '14

(Source: poyzn)

Jun 29 '14

Perspectives on Learning

iCog conference 2014
Perspectives on Learning
15th-16th October 2014
Informatics Forum, University of Edinburgh

The second annual iCog conference will focus on the theme of learning in cognitive science. We invite the submission of abstracts from postgraduate and early-career researchers in anthropology, computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines.

Abstracts should be no more than 500 words, and can be submitted at tinyurl.com/icogsubmission.

Please use the ‘abstract’ box to specify whether you wish to be considered for a full 20-minute presentation, a poster, or both. The full 500-word abstract should then be uploaded where the option is given to upload a paper. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 22nd August 2014 (23:59 UK time). Any questions should be directed to icogconference2014@gmail.com.

Learning, broadly construed, provides a point of intersection between the disciplines that comprise cognitive science. We are interested in drawing together different perspectives on the theme of learning in order to facilitate co-operation between the disciplines and to develop new approaches to old problems. We understand learning to include a diverse range of topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Neural plasticity
  • Memory formation
  • Language acquisition
  • Machine learning
  • Pedagogy and imitation
  • Cultural transmission

We are interested in any submissions on the theme of learning in cognitive science, but have come up with a list of potential questions in order to provide some inspiration:

  • What is the relationship between the neural processes involved in learning and the environment that learning takes place in?
  • What kind of neural architectures are involved in learning?
  • How is pedagogy influenced by culture and other social factors?
  • What is the contribution of the teacher, the student and their peers, to the learning process?
  • Is the best way of understanding learning as knowledge transmission? Is it a more enactive process? Or is there some further way of understanding how people learn?
  • How should we understand the relationship between neural plasticity, learning in individuals, and learning in society?
  • Do cultures learn, and if so, how?
  • What can attempts at machine learning tell us about learning in natural systems?
  • What makes learning distinct from simply responding to a stimulus?
  • Can the interdisciplinary nature of cognitive science contribute to our understanding of learning? If so, how?
  • Does learning language transform how and what we can learn?
  • How does learning in another language affect the learning process?

Confirmed guest speakers:
Andrew Philippides (Informatics, Sussex)
Jean-Marc Dewaele (Applied Linguistics and Communication, Birkbeck)
Szu-Han Wang (Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems, Edinburgh)
Alex Doumas (Psychology, Edinburgh)

We are grateful for the support of the School of Philosophy, Psychology, and Language Sciences at the University of Edinburgh and Eidyn (The Edinburgh Centre for Epistemology, Mind, and Normativity).

Jun 26 '14
"Power is being able to say complete and utter nonsense and have it be believed, powerlessness is where no matter how much cogent evidence and proof one has, to not be believed."
Catharine MacKinnon. (via womentoadmire)
Jun 24 '14
"Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know."

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

Jun 23 '14
"

There is some evidence that meditation boosts the immune response in vaccine recipients and people with cancer, protects against a relapse in major depression, soothes skin conditions and even slows the progression of HIV. Meditation might even slow the aging process. Telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes, get shorter every time a cell divides and so play a role in aging. Clifford Saron of the Center for Mind and Brain at the University of California, Davis, and colleagues showed in 2011 that levels of an enzyme that builds up telomeres were higher in people who attended a three-month meditation retreat than in a control group.

As with social interaction, meditation probably works largely by influencing stress response pathways. People who meditate have lower cortisol levels, and one study showed they have changes in their amygdala, a brain area involved in fear and the response to threat.

"

Fascinating read on the science behind how our minds affect our bodies, from loneliness to optimism to meditation (via explore-blog)

(Our mind is part of body - down with silly dualisms!)

Jun 20 '14
"Most of the world’s exploited labor comes from women. Women work in the sweatshops and the giant factories. Women sow and tend and harvest the world’s crops. Women carry and birth and raise children. Women wash and clean and shop and cook. Women care for the sick and the elderly. All of this - layer upon layer of labor - is what makes human society possible. Ripping it off is what makes capitalism possible."