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Greetings

Greetings... this blog is a higgledy-piggledy pile of social-political stuff, pictures I like, and general ramblings.
I'm also involved in wangclub.tumblr.com
Feb 19 '12
Whoever made this, you’re getting angry at the wrong people - being fat positive does not equal being thin negative. Fat people who accept themselves are not a threat to thin people. The mainstream media, patriarchal ideology and the people who spread the normative and narrow rules of what is attractive, desirable and valuable, the people who spread women-negative, body-negative and people-negative messages, are responsible for making many women feel ugly, ashamed, and not valued. For example, the magazines that spends one page being disgusted at celebrities who are too skinny, and two pages later have dodgy diet plans for losing weight, the same magazines who in their next issue will have a spread being disgusted at women who have put on weight, who have cellulite and stretch marks, these are the kind of things that are a threat to women. The same magazines, that in the next addition, will talk about ‘real women having curves’, as if the the size or shape of your body is what makes you a women, the messages sent from this kind of behaviour and language are the problem. This is not the language of fat or body-positivity, this is the language of women-hating. This is not even going into the fact that most of the mainstream media, and a hell of a lot of people, talk about fat people as disgusting, lazy and less valuable people, whereas thin people are not generally talked about that way, at least not as incessantly.
On the idea of telling people to lose weight (or gain weight)… well I don’t know how to reply to that, to me, that’s obviously an unpleasant, presumptuous and judgemental way of talking to people.I was often insulted in school for being too skinny, i was called ‘anna’, short for ‘anorexic’, several times, and generally taken the piss out of. But, funnily enough, the same people, generally boys, who said this too me, were the same boys who called young women skets (british slang for slut/whore), and who molested girls. They were not fat people that had a problem with my skinnyness, they were boys who thought they had the right to girls bodies - to comment on them, and physically assault them. Furthermore, the idea that believing yourself to be beautiful is the pinnacle of liberation or empowerment is problematic. Reacting to patriarchal values of beauty by only concentrating on how anyone is beautiful is limited for two, interrelated, reasons. Firstly, I can look in the mirror and see my body as beautiful, but I think often I am just objectifying myself, in that I am seeing my body as an object to be judged, it’s almost like being voyeuristic towards yourself: you are an observer, judging your body as if you are detached from it. Generally, in our society, women’s bodies are seen to belong to men/the public sphere, that’s why media outlets think its their absolute right to analyse and comment on, judge, and insult women’s bodies constantly.  This ties in with the idea that it is OK to tell someone to lose/gain weight*- as though their bodies are object that belong to the public, that the public has a right to tell people what to with their bodies. Women’s bodies do not belong to men or the the public realm, but it’s not because a woman’s body belongs herself, it’s because you cannot own a body, you cannot even own your body. The language of ownership detaches a person from their body, making their body into and object, a thing that is viewed by an observer. Your body is not something you own, because it is not an object, it is something you live through. So, to me, believing yourself to be beautiful isn’t as important as learning to inhabit, occupy, understand, accept your body regardless of beauty or ugliness, expressing your agency, and fighting against attempts of other people to own your body. 
Secondly, concentrating on how everyone is beautiful because you are reacting to mainstream views that only a slim (yet not too skinny) hourglass, hairless-everywhere-other-than-the-head, white, non-disabled, cis woman is beautiful, does nothing to challenge the view that the most important thing about a women is that she is attractive and desirable. This is not to say that it is wrong to care about your appearance - that it is wrong to (care about whether you) see yourself as beautiful/attractive/desirable, or wrong to care about whether others see you as beautiful/attractive/desirable. Most of us will always care. The problem is the priority given to beauty over other attributes of a person. A person is much more than the way they look, so whether or not you are coming from a normative position, if appearance are prioritised over personality and morality you are reinforcing the dominant discourse, which objectifies women.
On a side note, i find it ridiculous that the tumblr address on the bottom of this picture is the-unpopular-opinions, because the opinion it expresses is far more popular than the opinions expressed in fat and body positive tumblrs. The person in the photo doesn’t look dissimilar to the vast majority of women in catwalks, in fashion magazines, celebrity magazines, and on the television i.e. that body shape is held up as beautiful almost everywhere you turn, so the statement written on top of the picture is pretty absurd. Its a massively reactionary, small-minded, and delusional view being dressed as a brave, unpopular view. 
* except in extreme circumstances, if you are a doctor of some sort, advising someone for their own health. If, when my friend had anorexia, a nutritionist hadn’t encouraged her  to gain weight, I would have been pretty angry.

Whoever made this, you’re getting angry at the wrong people - being fat positive does not equal being thin negative. Fat people who accept themselves are not a threat to thin people. The mainstream media, patriarchal ideology and the people who spread the normative and narrow rules of what is attractive, desirable and valuable, the people who spread women-negative, body-negative and people-negative messages, are responsible for making many women feel ugly, ashamed, and not valued. For example, the magazines that spends one page being disgusted at celebrities who are too skinny, and two pages later have dodgy diet plans for losing weight, the same magazines who in their next issue will have a spread being disgusted at women who have put on weight, who have cellulite and stretch marks, these are the kind of things that are a threat to women. The same magazines, that in the next addition, will talk about ‘real women having curves’, as if the the size or shape of your body is what makes you a women, the messages sent from this kind of behaviour and language are the problem. This is not the language of fat or body-positivity, this is the language of women-hating.

This is not even going into the fact that most of the mainstream media, and a hell of a lot of people, talk about fat people as disgusting, lazy and less valuable people, whereas thin people are not generally talked about that way, at least not as incessantly.

On the idea of telling people to lose weight (or gain weight)… well I don’t know how to reply to that, to me, that’s obviously an unpleasant, presumptuous and judgemental way of talking to people.

I was often insulted in school for being too skinny, i was called ‘anna’, short for ‘anorexic’, several times, and generally taken the piss out of. But, funnily enough, the same people, generally boys, who said this too me, were the same boys who called young women skets (british slang for slut/whore), and who molested girls. They were not fat people that had a problem with my skinnyness, they were boys who thought they had the right to girls bodies - to comment on them, and physically assault them.

Furthermore, the idea that believing yourself to be beautiful is the pinnacle of liberation or empowerment is problematic. Reacting to patriarchal values of beauty by only concentrating on how anyone is beautiful is limited for two, interrelated, reasons. Firstly, I can look in the mirror and see my body as beautiful, but I think often I am just objectifying myself, in that I am seeing my body as an object to be judged, it’s almost like being voyeuristic towards yourself: you are an observer, judging your body as if you are detached from it. Generally, in our society, women’s bodies are seen to belong to men/the public sphere, that’s why media outlets think its their absolute right to analyse and comment on, judge, and insult women’s bodies constantly.  This ties in with the idea that it is OK to tell someone to lose/gain weight*- as though their bodies are object that belong to the public, that the public has a right to tell people what to with their bodies. Women’s bodies do not belong to men or the the public realm, but it’s not because a woman’s body belongs herself, it’s because you cannot own a body, you cannot even own your body. The language of ownership detaches a person from their body, making their body into and object, a thing that is viewed by an observer. Your body is not something you own, because it is not an object, it is something you live through. So, to me, believing yourself to be beautiful isn’t as important as learning to inhabit, occupy, understand, accept your body regardless of beauty or ugliness, expressing your agency, and fighting against attempts of other people to own your body. 

Secondly, concentrating on how everyone is beautiful because you are reacting to mainstream views that only a slim (yet not too skinny) hourglass, hairless-everywhere-other-than-the-head, white, non-disabled, cis woman is beautiful, does nothing to challenge the view that the most important thing about a women is that she is attractive and desirable. This is not to say that it is wrong to care about your appearance - that it is wrong to (care about whether you) see yourself as beautiful/attractive/desirable, or wrong to care about whether others see you as beautiful/attractive/desirable. Most of us will always care. The problem is the priority given to beauty over other attributes of a person. A person is much more than the way they look, so whether or not you are coming from a normative position, if appearance are prioritised over personality and morality you are reinforcing the dominant discourse, which objectifies women.

On a side note, i find it ridiculous that the tumblr address on the bottom of this picture is the-unpopular-opinions, because the opinion it expresses is far more popular than the opinions expressed in fat and body positive tumblrs. The person in the photo doesn’t look dissimilar to the vast majority of women in catwalks, in fashion magazines, celebrity magazines, and on the television i.e. that body shape is held up as beautiful almost everywhere you turn, so the statement written on top of the picture is pretty absurd. Its a massively reactionary, small-minded, and delusional view being dressed as a brave, unpopular view. 

* except in extreme circumstances, if you are a doctor of some sort, advising someone for their own health. If, when my friend had anorexia, a nutritionist hadn’t encouraged her  to gain weight, I would have been pretty angry.

(Source: meowwlinzii)

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